Bamboo vs. Cotton Mattress Protector - Which One Is Better?

mattress protector on bed

We all love the spotless gleam of a new mattress and want to preserve it at all costs, but we also know it won't last. Night sweats, body oils, water spills, baby vomit, unwanted tears and stains, dust mites… Sooner or later, it will all end up on the mattress.

Well, if you use mattress protectors, you won't need to worry about ruining your mattress right away. As their name says, mattress protectors are specially designed to provide extra protection for your mattress from all kinds of spots and spills.

In this article, we’ll talk about bamboo vs. cotton mattress protectors and give you a little bit more info on what you should look for when choosing a material for your mattress protector.

Bamboo Mattress Protector

Bamboo fabric is an eco-friendly, sustainable material made from the bamboo plant. Apart from being the number one favorite snack of pandas, it's also a material used to make clothes, paper, flooring, furniture, and even food. But bamboo is also used in the bedding and mattress industry—that's why you can find bamboo mattresses, bamboo mattress toppers, bamboo mattress protectors, and also bamboo sheets and pillows.

There are different types of mattress protectors:

  • Fitted protectors - these are pretty easy to put on as you do with a fitted sheet. Each stretchable side is supposed to go to a different corner of the mattress;
  • Elastic strap protectors - these are very similar to the fitted sheet protectors; an elastic strap is utilized to secure the protector to the mattress on all four corners;
  • Full encasement - full encasement means that the whole mattress goes inside the protector, which you then secure with zip or velcro straps. These types of protectors can be a bit challenging to use because you'll need to lift the whole mattress and put it in the encasement.

Why Is Bamboo So Desirable?

Well, it's simple; it's because of its natural properties that are:

  • Antimicrobial
  • Antibacterial;
  • Deodorizing;
  • Moisture-wicking

And since it has such important antimicrobial properties, bamboo doesn't really require the use of pesticides to grow unobstructed.

Bamboo products are made from natural fibres as opposed to a lot of bedding and mattress protectors made from synthetic fibres such as polyester. However, bamboo can be treated with harsh chemicals as well—the material rayon is a good example. Rayon goes through several different phases of chemical treatment, making it not so eco-friendly, although it does keep its antibacterial, odor, and moisture-resistant properties.

Why You Should Use a Bamboo Mattress Protector

Comfiness, softness, and breathability are essential for a good night's sleep. Bamboo fabric offers you all of this and more.

Bamboo Is a Highly Breathable Fabric

Bamboo fiber is one of the most breathable materials you can find. It's great for body temperature regulation because it helps conduct heat better and keeps the body cool during sleep. 

It's perfect for hot sleepers and for people who often experience night sweats or those who just live in a hotter climate. Since bamboo fiber has moisture-wicking properties, you won't find your skin stuck to your sheets in the middle of the night. This also prevents the emergence of mold on the mattress as well as the mattress protector.

Bamboo Is Antimicrobial and Hypoallergenic

Bamboo fabric is perfect for people prone to allergies and people who have sensitive skin. This is a result of bamboo’s natural properties—bamboo fabric protects the skin from irritation and too much friction during sleep.

The chemical structure of bamboo allows for the material not to hold bacteria and other microorganisms too long on its surface but also inside the material as well.

Cotton Mattress Protector

Cotton is one of the most popular fabrics in the mattress and bed linen industry, and it's no wonder; cotton is lightweight, easily washable, and very versatile, given its cotton varieties. This versatility also goes hand in hand with variance in quality, which means that you can find very cheap, affordable cotton sheets, a mattress topper, or a mattress pad, but you can also find more high-end bed products, like the ones made from Pima cotton.

However, because cotton is so widely used, it requires a lot of pesticide use so it can grow in large quantities. It's often treated and mixed with harsh chemicals to make it softer or more dye-absorbent.

Why Is Cotton a Good Option for a Mattress Protector Fabric?

Cotton has its good sides—here are some reasons why it's a good idea to use a cotton mattress topper.

Easy to Clean

Cleaning cotton is really easy—you just toss it into the machine, and that's it. You can often wash it at high temperatures, although you should always read the label before doing so. Cotton can shrink with multiple washes, but it depends on what temperature you're washing it and how you dry it.

Very Durable Material

Cotton is generally considered to be durable, resistant to frequent wear and tears, although this also largely depends on the type and quality of the cotton used.

Which Is Better - Bamboo or Cotton Mattress Protector?

Bamboo mattress protectors are becoming more and more desirable nowadays. They're good for the environment, don't require the use of pesticides, have a really smooth, silky feel, and can be super soft and really comfy to sleep on.

Bamboo mattress protectors are also more lightweight, and they're perfect for sleeping in hot weather.

Cotton is also still widely used, and it's not a wrong option per se. As we said, it can be very affordable, durable, easy to clean, and the high-quality types can also give you a luxurious feel of softness and comfort. But this comes with a price: it's less eco-friendly and more likely to contain harsh or toxic chemicals than bamboo.

The good news is that there is a variety of products made from bamboo available for your bedroom and your ultimate comfort: bamboo mattress pads, bamboo linen, bamboo sheets, bamboo mattress toppers, as well as memory foam mattresses made from bamboo materials.

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